Linguistics 100 Solved MCQS from past Papers

 

Linguistics 100 Solved MCQS from past Papers
 Linguistics MCQs 

      CORRECT SIGN ©


  1. According to Hinduism, language came from

  1. Sarasvati ©

  2. Brahma

  3. Vishnu

  4. Ishvara

  1. Language might be started by the imitation of sounds which early men and women heard around them. This describes

  1. Ye-heave-ho theory

  2. Bow-wow theory ©

  3. Oral-gesture theory

Divine source The sounds of a person involved in physical effort could be the source of our language describes

  1.  Ye-heave-ho theory ©

  2. Bow-wow theory

  3. Oral-gesture theory

  4. Divine source theory

  1.  The biological basis of formation and development of human language is called

  1. Glossogentics ©

  2. Biogenetics

  3. Physogenitcs

  4. Morphology

  1. Human beings can talk about their present, past and future. This property of language is called

  1. Duality

  2. Arbitrariness

  3. Displacement ©

  4. Productivity

  1. There is no connection between a linguistic form and its meaning describes

  1.  Duality

  2. Arbitrariness ©

  3. Displacement

  4. Productivity

  1.  We can utter new and novel words and sentences but animal  can’t. It describes which property?

  1.  Duality

  2. Arbitrariness

  3. Displacement

  4. Productivity ©

  1. `A little change in the sound can change the meaning describes which property of human language?

  1. Duality

  2. Displacement

  3. Discreetness ©

  4. Cultural Transmission

  1.  The general study of characteristics of speech sounds is called

  1. Phonetics ©

  2. Phonology

  3. Articulatory Phonetics

  4. Auditory Phonetics

  5. Acoustic Phonetics

  1. The study of movement of speech organs in articulation of speech or the study of how the speech sounds are made is called

 

  1. Phonetics

  2. Phonology

  3. Articulatory Phonetics ©

  4. Auditory Phonetics

  5. Acoustic Phonetics

  1. The study of physical properties of a language is called

  1.  Phonetics

  2. Phonology

  3. Articulatory Phonetics

  4. Auditory Phonetics

  5. Acoustic Phonetics ©

  1. The study of perceptions of speech sounds is called

  1.  Phonetics

  2. Phonology

  3. Articulatory Phonetics

  4. Auditory Phonetics

  5. Acoustic Phonetics ©

  1. The study of sounds involving speaker’ s identification and analysis of recorded utterances is called

  1.  Forensic phonetics ©

  2. Acoustic Phonetics

  3. Articulatory Phonetics

  4. Auditory Phonetics

  1. When the vocal cords are spread apart and the air from the lungs passes between them unimpeded(without any stoppage) the sound is called

  1. Unvoiced

  2. Voiceless

  3. Both ©

  4. Voiced

  1. When there is some vibration in vocal cord while producing sound, the sound will be

  1. Voiced ©

  2. Unvoiced

  3. Voiceless

  4. None

  1. There are total________ sounds in English Language

  1. 42

  2. 44 ©

  3. 46

  4. 48

  1. Total number of vowel and consonant sounds in English respectively

  1. 24, 20

  2. 20, 24 ©

  3. 22,22


The sounds in English language are classified as Bilabials, Dentals, Alveolar etc it is according to their

  1. Place of Articulation ©

  2. Manner of Articulation

  3. Both

  4. None

  1. The sounds which are formed using both upper and lower lips (/m/, /b/,/w/) are called

  1. Bilabials ©

  2. Labiodentals

  3. Dentals

  4. Alveolar

  1. /f/ and /v/ are

  1.  Bilabials

  2. Labiodentals ©

  3. Dentals

  4. Alveolar

  1. The sounds formed with tongue tip behind(between) the upper front teeth (ð, θ] are called

 

  1. Bilabials

  2. Labiodentals

  3. Dentals (interdentals) ©

  4. Alveolar

  1. /t/, /d/, /s/, /n/ ad /z/ are called ________ because they are pronounced with the front part of the tongue on the alveolar ridge.

  1.  Bilabials

  2. Labiodentals

  3. Dentals

  4. Alveolar ©

  1. /k/ and /g/ are called

  1.  Bilabials

  2. Velars ©

  3. Dentals

  4. Alveolar

  1. There a sound that is produced without the active use of the tongue and the other parts of the mouth. What is it called?

  1.  Bilabials

  2. Velar

  3. Glottal ©

  4. Alveolar

  1. IPA stands for

  1. International Phonetic Association(Alphabet ) ©

  2. International Phonetic Authority

  3. International Phonetic  Academy

  4. International Phonic Association

The consonants sounds resulting from a  blocking effect on air stream is called Nasals

  1. Affricates

  2. Fricatives

  3. Plosives or Stops ©


  1. /p/, /b/, /t/, /d/,/k/ and /g/ are 6

  1. Plosives ©

  2. Nasals

  3. Liquids

  4. Fricatives

  1. The consonants having the air push through the narrow opening are called

  1.   Plosives

  2. Nasals

  3. Liquids

  4. Fricatives ©

  1. Find the examples of Affricates

  1. /m/, /n/,/b/

  2. /f/,/v/

  3. /ð/, /θ/

  4. /tʃ/,/dǯ/ ©

  1. /m/, /n/ and /ђ/ are called______________ consonants.

 

  1.   Plosive

  2. Nasal ©

  3. Liquid

  4. Fricative

  1. /w/, /r/and /j/ are called__________ consonants.

  1. Nasal

  2. Gliding

  3. Approximant

  4. Both B and C ©

  1. Find out liquid consonants.

  1. /l/,/r/

  2. /l/,/m/

  3. /l/,/n/

  4. /t,/,/p/

  1. What are the syllabic consonants in the following

   /l/,/r/ 

  1. /l/,/m/

  2. /l/,/n/ ©

  3. /t,/,/p/

  1. In American English if /t/ occurs between vowels, it is pronounced as /d/; for example, writer as rider and metal as medal. Name this term.

  1. Flapping ©

  2. Taping

  3. Stopping

  4. Mashing

  1. The only lateral sound is

  1. /l/ ©

  2. /t/

  3. /b/

  4. /h/

  1. The ___________ sounds are mostly articulated with obstruction in the vocal cart.

  1. Vowel

  2. Consonant ©

  3. Abstract

  4. Diphthongs

  1. The sounds which are pronounced without any obstruction in air passage, and are produced with a free flow of air are called

  1.  Vowel ©

  2. Consonant

  3. Abstract

  4. Diphthongs

  1. Mark the number of monothongs and diphthongs respectively.

  1. 12, 8 ©

  2. 8,12

  3. 14.6

  4. 14.8

  1. Read the transcription and judge the words (ˈ/flaʊə/, /ɔːtəməbiːl/,/ ˈkriːtʃə/

  1. Flower, Reach, mobile

  2. Flour, mobile. Crèches

  3. Flour, Automobile, Creature ©

  4. Flower, Mobile, Richer

  1.  The study of speech patterns is called

  1. Phonetics

  2. Phonology ©

  3. Morphology

  4. Pragmatics

  1. The smallest unit of speech sound is called

  1. Morpheme

  2. Phoneme ©

  3. Lexeme

  4. Allophone

  1. The versions of one phone are called

  1.  Morpheme

  2. Phoneme

  3. Lexeme

  4. Allophone ©

  1. A sound pronounced with one puff of air is called ( a sound with one vowel sound)

  1. Vowel

  2. Consonant

  3. Syllable ©

  4. Coda

  1. Syllable consists of onset and rime while rime is further divided into

  1. Onset and nucleus

  2. Onset and coda

  3. Nucleus and onset

  4. Nucleus and coda ©

  1. The consonants after the nucleus are called

  1. Onset

  2. Coda ©

  3. Syllable

  1. The syllables having onset and nucleus but not coda are called

  1. Open syllables ©

  2. Closed syllable

  3. Light syllable

  4. Heavy syllable

  1. The syllables having nucleus and coda but no onset are called

  1.  Open syllables

  2. Closed syllable ©

  3. Light syllable

  4. Heavy syllable

  1.  There are one or more consonants before or after nucleus which describes

  1. Consonant Cluster ©

  2. Elision

  3. Assimilation

  4. Syllable

  1. When two phonemes occurring in a sequence, and some aspect of one phoneme is taken or copied by other phoneme, this process is called

  1.  Consonant Cluster

  2. Elision

  3. Assimilation ©

  4. Syllable

  1. The omission or deletion of some sound from a word is known as

  1.   Consonant Cluster

  2. Elision ©

  3. Assimilation

  4. Syllable


Linguistics MCQs (Part 2)

  1. When the name of  a company becomes the name of its product, it is called

  1. Coinage ©

  2. Blending

  3. Compounding

  1. When one part of a word is joined with other part of other word, we get a new word. This process is known as

  1.   Coinage

  2. Calques

  3. Blending ©

  4. Compounding

  1. When one part of a word is joined with other part of other word, we get a new word. Such type of words in linguistics terminology are called

  1. Acronyms

  2. Portmanteau  ©

  3. Palindrome

  4. Slang

  1. A word, phrase or sentence having same sequence of alphabet from left to right and right to left( for example, madam, nurses run)  are called

  1.   Acronyms

  2. Portmanteau 

  3. Palindrome ©

  4. Slang

  1. If a word of more than one syllable is reduced to a shorten form ( for example;  laboratory to lab, gasoline to gas, advertisement to ad) this process will be termed as


  1. Compounding

  2. Clipping ©

  3. Hypocorism

  4. Conversion

  1. If a long word is reduced to single syllable and then “y” or “ie” is added to end to make new words  (example handkerchief to hankie, and breakfast to breaky) the process is called


  1. Compounding

  2. Clipping

  3. Hypocorism ©

  4. Conversion

  1. A change in the function of a word, when a noun is used as verb or a verb is used as a noun it is called

             Clipping

  1. Hypocorism

  2. Conversion ©

  1. NASA, NATO, UNESCO are the example of

  1. Abbreviations

  2. Acronyms ©

  3. Compounding

  4. Mixing

  1. To form new words by attaching affixes with existing words is called

  1. Abbreviation

  2. Acronym

  3. Conversion

  4. Derivation ©

  1. The study of forms ( words) is called

  1. Phonetics

  2. Phonology

  3. Morphology ©

  4. Assimilation

  1. originally, morphology is a

  1. Linguistic term

  2. Literary term

  3. Biological term ©

  4. Mathematical term

  1. A minimal unit of meaning or grammatical function or a minimum unit of word is called

  1. Phoneme

  2. Morpheme

  3. Lexeme

  4. Phone

  1. A word or a group of word which has one meaning is called

  1.   Phoneme

  2. Morpheme

  3. Lexeme ©

  4. Phone

  1. The morphemes which are independent to give meaning and they can stand by as single words are called

  1. Free morphemes ©

  2. Bound morphemes

  3. Inflectional morphemes

  4. Derivational morphemes

  1. The morphemes which are dependent to other words  give meaning and they cannot stand by as single words are called

  1.  Free morphemes

  2. Bound morphemes ©

  3. Lexical morphemes

  4. Derivational morphemes

All the affixes in English are  Free morphemes

  1. Bound morphemes ©

  2. Lexical morphemes

  3. Independent morphemes

  1. The word to which affixes are attached is technically known as

  1. Phoneme

  2. Morpheme

  3. Stem ©

  4. Lexeme

  1. Lexical and functional morphemes are two types  of

  1. Free morphemes ©

  2. Bound morphemes

  3. Derivational morphemes

  4. Inflectional morphemes

  1. Nouns, verbs and adjectives come under

  1.   Lexical morphemes ©

  2. Functional morphemes

  3. Derivational morphemes

  4. Inflectional morphemes

  1. Articles, pronouns and prepositions cover

  1.  Lexical morphemes

  2. Functional morphemes ©

  3. Derivational morphemes

  4. Inflectional morphemes

  1. Which of type of morphemes is used to indicate the grammatical function of a word

 

  1. Lexical morphemes

  2. Functional morphemes

  3. Derivational morphemes

  4. Inflectional morphemes ©

  1. There are total__________ inflectional morphemes in English language.

  1. 5

  2. 6

  3. 8 ©

  4. 10

  1.  The study of rules of a language covers

  1. Grammar ©

  2. Syntax

  3. Semantics

  4. Pragmatics

  1. Following two languages are considered Classical languages

  1. Arabic and Greek

  2. Greek and Latin ©

  3. Greek and English

  4. Latin and Dutch

  1. English followed ____________ language for making rules of grammar

  1. Greek

  2. Latin ©

  3. Dutch

  4. Scottish

  1. Which of the following approaches deals with the set of grammar rules and focuses on the teaching of grammar rules?

  1. Descriptive Approach

  2. Prescriptive Approach ©

  3. Generative approach

  4. Mystic approach

  1.  Mention the approach which discourages the too much focus on rules of language, according to it, how language is used is important rather than how language should be used.

  1.    Descriptive Approach ©

  2. Prescriptive Approach

Generative approach Mystic approach

  1. Syntax is originally taken from a___________ word

  1. Greek ©

  2. Latin

  3. Germen

  4. Russian

  1. The study of order or arrangements of words is called

  1. Grammar

  2. Syntax ©

  3. Semantics

  4. Pragmatics

  1. The study of meaning of forms is called

  1.  Grammar

  2. Syntax

  3. Semantics ©

  4. Pragmatics

  1. “The table was listening to the music”. This sentence syntactically is correct, but ___________ wrong.

  1. Semantically ©

  2. Grammatically

  3. Pragmatically

  4. Morphologically

  1. When the meaning of one form is included in the meaning of another form it is called

  1. Hyponymy ©

  2. Polysemy

  3. Homonymy

  4. Prototypes

  1. Horse is________ of animal

  1. Hyponym ©

  2. Co-hyponym

  3. Homonym

  4. Homophone

  1. When two words have different different spellings have same pronunciations (for example, meet, meat, flour flower) they are called

  1. Homonyms

  2. Homophones

  3. Hyponyms

Metonyms When one word has two or more meanings or two words have two different meanings but same spellings are called. (examples; bank- of river, bank- a financial institution)

  1.  Homonyms ©

  2. Homophones

  3. Hyponyms

  4. Metonyms

  1. When one form have different meanings which are all related by extension, the term is named

  1.  Hyponymy

  2. Polysemy ©

  3. Homonymy

  4. Prototypes

  1. Words frequently occurring together are termed as ( examples; husband and wife,salt-pepper)

  1. Synecdoche

  2. Metonymy

  3. Collocation ©

  4. polysemy

  1. When a part represents a whole entity it is known as 

 

  1. Synecdoche ©

  2. Metonymy

  3. Collocation

  4. Polysemy

  1. The study of intended speaker meaning is called

  1. Semantics

  2. Syntax

  3. Pragmatics ©

  4. Grammar

  1. The set of words used in the same phrase or sentence is called linguistics context. It is also known as

  1. Co-text ©

  2. Dixie

  3. Anaphora

  4. Inference

  1. Word s that cannot be interpreted at all without the physical context of the speaker are called

  1.  Co-text

  2. Dixies ©

  3. Anaphora

            Inference 

Any additional information used by the listener to connect what is said to what must be meant is called

  1.  Co-text

  2. Dixies

  3. Anaphora

  4. Inference ©

  1. A subsequent reference to an already introduced entity is called

  1.  Co-text

  2. Antecedent 

  3. Anaphora ©

  4. Inference

  1. Linkage of ideas in a text is called

  1. Cohesion

  2. Coherence ©

  3. Anaphora

  4. Co-text

  1. A conventional knowledge structure which exists in memory is called

  1.  Cohesion

  2. Schema ©

  3. Anaphora

  4. Co-text

  1. When we feel extreme difficulty in production of speech which part of our brain is damaged?

  1. Broca’ Area ©

        Wernicke’s

         Motor cortex

  1. Arcuate fasciculus

  1. Damage in Wernicke’s Area of brain causes difficulty in

  1. Speech production

  2. Speech comprehension ©

  3. Speech listening

  4. Speech memorizing

  1. Which of the following part of the brain controls the articulatry muscles, jaw, tongue and lynx?

  1.  Broca’ Area

  2. Wernicke’s area

  3. Motor cortex ©

  4. Arcuate fasciculus

  1. Which of the following parts forms a crucial connection between Brcoa’s area and Wernicke’s area?

  1.  Vex Area

  2. Motor cortex

  3. Arcuate fasciculu ©

  4. John’s Area

  1. Language ability is located in _________ of the brain

  1. Right Hemisphere

  2. Left Hemisphere ©

  3. Both

  4. None

Majid Farooq lecturer in English Superior college govt teacher from 

             

Arifwala, Pakistan 

                 

Eveningstar.2011@yahoo.com


0 thoughts on “Linguistics 100 Solved MCQS from past Papers”

  1. ði Hon'ble Ma'm !
    ˈsplɛndɪd! ˈɛksələnt ˌɔːgənaɪˈzeɪʃən. ˈɛvɪdəns ɒv wɒt kəˈmɪtmənt kæn əˈʧiːv. kənˌgrætjʊˈleɪʃənz juː ɒn jɔːr ɪnˈtɛgrɪti wʌns əˈgɛn.

    Reply

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